the-secrets-of-making-a-rose-champagne

The secrets of making a Rosé Champagne

Apr 14, 2021 • 2 mins

The clue is in the name: rosé d'assemblage, meaning “blended rosé”. Created by Madame Clicquot in 1818, to make it you blend a white wine with a red wine.

The winemaker produces a white wine from white or black grapes (yes, you can obtain a white wine from black grapes! The juice just has to be pressed very quickly). At the same time, he or she also creates a good quality red wine from Pinot Noir or Meunier grapes. Then 5 to 20% of this red wine is added to the white wine. The higher the percentage of red wine, the stronger the pink colour.

Le rosé d'assemblage

The clue is in the name: rosé d'assemblage, meaning “blended rosé”. Created by Madame Clicquot in 1818, to make it you blend a white wine with a red wine.

The winemaker produces a white wine from white or black grapes (yes, you can obtain a white wine from black grapes! The juice just has to be pressed very quickly). At the same time, he or she also creates a good quality red wine from Pinot Noir or Meunier grapes. Then 5 to 20% of this red wine is added to the white wine. The higher the percentage of red wine, the stronger the pink colour.

Rosé de saignée (or rosé de macération)

A less common method, this requires the use of a more sophisticated technique with very fast response times.

To create a rosé de saignée champagne, the must (unfermented grape juice obtained by crushing or pressing) is left to macerate for a few hours with the grape skins. The skins then transmit their colour and aromas to the juice. The longer the infusion, the more full-bodied the wine. After maceration, the must is then "saignée" or “bled”. This means that the content is drained to separate the must from the skins.

Rosé d'assemblage is often sweeter and more luscious, while rosé de saignée is closer to some red wines.

So, which one do you prefer?